Call us
image
imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

Rare Queen Anne Walnut Feather-banded Bureau with Original Handles c. 1715

An exceptionally rare early 18th Century walnut bureau with an excellent colour and in very original condition
£3,200
Dated
c.1715
Dimensions
39 inches wide, 18.5 inches deep and 38 inches high.

Depth when fall open is 31 inches. Floor to fall is 27.25 inches.

Interior useable drawer depths are 4.25 inches in the top drawers, 5.25 inches in the middle and 6.5 inches in the bottom.

For metric please multiply by 2.5
Full Description
The bureau in two parts with upper lift off writing desk and lower chest with side carrying handles and made at a time when the fashion for the large scriptors of the William and Mary period was waning and a smaller form of writing desk became desirable. This bureau neatly demonstrates that transition and pre-dates the 'one piece' bureaux of the Georgian period.

The small brass handles are original and have knock marks beneath the rings where these have lightly touched the surface during use. Over three centuries these tiny touches bruise the surface of the walnut and leave a small dark mark. The escutcheons and locks are original also as are the drawer linings which are in oak. The fall lowers smoothly on original hinges to sit firm and flat on the lopers and the lock is original and has a working key. The interior is of a simple form but is high quality and in oak with most attractive carved detailing to the bottom of each divider. The small inner drawers all oak lined. The feet original with hand hewn supporting blocks beneath the bureau, the thickly cut walnut veneers are continuous to both side panels and extend to the feet tips. The backboards of wainscot oak and large dovetails are visible beneath the bureau in fixing the bottom boards, early second phase construction. Minor dings, marks and small veneer repairs, some depletions to the very bottom of the feet, the drawer runners have been professionally re-tipped in oak where worn with use and fine oak fillets have been set into the channels of the dustboards where the drawer runners have grooved these. Again a very high quality work and the bureau has been restored by an expert at some point in the last 150 years who has ensured it will continue in fine function and fettle for centuries to come.

A very beautiful example and only made in this transitional form for around a decade 1710-1720 before the more recognisable Georgian bureaux in one piece became the norm.